Fr Michael Manning Admits Affair with Cousin

Another prominent Catholic Priest in disrepute:

San Bernardino – A Roman Catholic priest with a worldwide television ministry based here has admitted to having a sexual relationship with his cousin, a county schools superintendent on California’s Central Coast.

The Rev. Michael Manning confirmed by phone that he had the relationship with Monterey County Superintendent of Schools Nancy Kotowski, when questioned about copies of correspondence sent to this newspaper that appeared to point to the two breaking off the relationship more than two years ago.

“We’ve been such good friends and there’s a deep love we have for each other,” Manning said. “The sexuality was secondary. It’s very hard when you care for someone, but I love my priesthood more. I admit the fact of my sinfulness. I’ve done wrong. That’s why I’ve stopped.”

Kotowski briefly reflected on her relationship with Manning that spanned decades.

“Father Mike Manning is a very dear and close friend of mine,” Kotowski said when reached at an anti-gang conference in Washington, D.C. “Our friendship has grown over 30 years, and we share a deep commitment of faithful and dedicated life of service in our respective work. I have nothing more to publicly say about this personal and private matter.”

Manning, 70, started the nonprofit Wordnet, a Catholic television ministry, in 1978. Wordnet’s programs are filmed and edited in the ministry’s downtown studio.

His TV show, “The Word in the World,” can be seen weekly on the Trinity Broadcasting Network.

He has appeared as a guest on several national TV shows, including “Larry King Live.”

Manning, who at one time led St. Anthony Parish on Western Avenue, is a member of the Society of the Divine Word, a missionary community with 6,000 members in 62 countries.

In 2006, he was presented with a medal, the Pro Ecclesia Et Pontifice Cross, which means “for the Church and the Holy Father.”

Gerald Barnes, bishop of the Diocese of San Bernardino, requested the award for meritorious service from Pope Benedict XVI for Manning’s decades of service in the Catholic Church.

Manning teaches at retreats and on religious tours around the world.

His ministry’s website at www.wordnet.tv is saturated with teaching materials for sale. Visitors to the website are invited to donate to the ministry, which the website says needs 800 donors giving about $25 a month to cover all expenses.

The website also offers a pamphlet written by Kotowski titled “Dealing With Teenagers.”

The pamphlet, which costs $2 but is listed as out of stock, is marketed as coming from “Fr. Mike’s own cousin, Nancy Kotowski.”

Manning said that Kotowski, 59, is his second cousin.

Marriage between first cousins is legal in California, while 25 states prohibit them, according to a website for the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Six states permit first-cousin marriage under certain circumstances, according to the website.

A biography posted at www.electnancy.com says Kotowski has 35 years of experience in education and holds several degrees, including a doctorate in education policy and organization from USC.

The biography says she was recognized by the Peace Corps as a Volunteer of the Year for her education development work in Cameroon, and that she sits on several boards, including the National Steinbeck Center in Salinas.

Manning wouldn’t say how long he and Kotowski were sexually involved.

The correspondence appears to reveal a conflicted priest struggling to remain faithful to his calling.

“The reality is I was living two lives: one as a priest who was vowed to celibacy and another life as a sexually active man in our sexual intimacy,” Manning wrote.

He told Kotowski that he battled hypocrisy, and deception was heavy on his heart as he feared people finding out about the relationship.

“The burden of deception in hotels, and with the community with whom I work and live has become overwhelming,” he wrote.

Manning said he and Kotowski realized their sexual relationship was wrong.

“I think we’re all sinners and I’m not above admitting we’re sinners, ” Manning said in the phone interview. “The important factor is what do you do after you sin? Can you accept forgiveness? And I’ve been able to accept forgiveness for what I’ve done.”

Manning said he is convinced of the importance and beauty of celibacy and that he told key staff at Wordnet about the matter.

Going forward with the ministry is “probably going to be very awkward,” he said, and he is considering taking a break.

John Andrews, spokesman for the diocese, said Manning is a pioneer in Catholic television and that the diocese supports him as he moves forward.

“It’s unfortunate that this has happened, and that is not the conduct that we expect from the priests and it’s not consistent with the vows a priest takes,” Andrews said. “At the same time, in our faith, you always have an opportunity to seek forgiveness from God and reconciliation. Father Manning has done that and we support him in that 100 percent.”

Manning said that before being questioned about the correspondence, he discussed the matter with his confessor only.

He said he will ask his supporters for their understanding and their prayers.

“That’s the neat thing with Jesus. There can be the chance of starting again,” Manning said.

Oh no, that last sentance seems really, really cheap!

Wikipedia has more on Fr Manning here.

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42 Responses to Fr Michael Manning Admits Affair with Cousin

  1. John Shuster says:

    Many people experience priests as not being very willing to forgive and welcome Catholics who are divorced, gay, or affected by other situations that leave them marginalized. Why is it that priests who do wrong are so quick to forgive themselves, and expect others to do the same?

    • So true. For one, there is a level of hypocrisy involved, but the seemingly flippant way in which this man simply forgives (absolves?) himself, is shocking. He is and should be held fully accountable for his actions which are embarrassing, if not to him self, then certainly to God’s holy Church, of which there should be real consequences.

      • Nina says:

        Excuse me but are you actually a priest? Who are you to judge…Father Manning never said he forgave himself..how do you know he did not confess to another priest..he said he “accepted”forgiveness..he didnt say he went ahead and forgave himself…we have a merciful God and what father Manning did was not right..but he is human…we are all sinners..we all make mistakes..we will face judgement and consequence from God.

    • Paul says:

      I know many Roman Catholic (“RC”) priests who live in clandestine marital relationships. The marriages may be legally confidential according to state law, or they may be between only God and the couple. Oftentimes it is what appears to be the priest/houskeeper scenario, or a spouse in a distant city. Most are older and children are not an issue. Sometimes bishops are aware of the arrangement, but say nothing until self righteous people discover the arrangement and begin to cast stones, making the situation public. The bishop must then “act” in order to protect his job.
       
      But how do such priests feel justified in living what appears to be a double (sinful) life? The answer lies in the concept of the “greater good.” Their ministry is more important than the RC law of celibacy.
       
      Can such a belief every be justified? I believe it can with the application of the doctrine of epikeia (please Google the article “Canon Law and Equity, A Tract Book” by Anthony J. Fejfar for an in depth explanation of epikeia). Epikeia in the matter of celibacy would dispense with the obligation and allow the marriage of the priest formerly committed thereto to continue his ministry, even if the marriage is only between God, the priest and his spouse.
       
      I strongly believe this because the imposition of celibacy for most RC priests has been to the very serious detriment of the Great Commission of Jesus to preach the Gospel to the ends of the earth. Also, the RC Church as a Eucharistic-centered church has denied the Mass/Eucharist to many of its faithful because there aren’t enough priests. And, it is against Scripture (39 popes were married, including the first pope; “bishops must be married but once” [1 Timothy 3:2]). These and many other good reasons cry out for the use of epikeia.
       
      Also, the celibate clerical state has long been a haven for men with sexual issues (e.g., the pedophile problem, or men trying to closet their homosexuality). Imagine what the RC church could have done with the billions it spent (and is still spending) on awards from lawsuits, legal fees and time. And what about all the priests who have been expelled? If you have a few days to peruse the list, you can find it here: http://www.bishop-accountability.org/priestdb/PriestDBbylastName-F.html. And what about the 150,000 priest who have left the active ministry because of the celibacy requirement.
       
      If you believe I’m off base about whether priests are celibate and straight, read the book The Changing Face of the Priesthood by Monsignor Donald Cozzens, Ph. D.

      Lastly, Catholics should understand that the history of celibacy did not happen because it is a “holy state.” Yes, St. Paul talked it up. But he also believed the Second Coming was days or weeks away. If celibacy were so holy, it would have been a sacrament. In fact, it was not until the twelfth century that priestly celibacy was imposed (Google “Letter on Marriage” by RC Jesuit priest Stephen Schloesser, Professor of History at Boston College) — because church property was being transferred to the children of priests when they died. Today it is also an excellent mechanism by which the Vatican can control its priests by keeping them in rectories and paying them practically nothing.

      There is an old concept in canon law circles: if you want to change the law, you’ve got to break the law. So leave alone Fr. Mike and the other priests who decide to marry or have relationships with women. Assume they have made good decisions in their individual consciences.

  2. Lisa says:

    As a faithful married catholic over 20 years, I feel sad, angry and betrayed. How are we suppose to live out our vocation, Holy Matrimony, if holy men of God can’t even live theirs? He had a HUGE responsibility as a public person in the media.

    • Lisa, while this is an old post, I want to encourage you to, please, not be overtaken by anger. Remember each priest is a human. Jesus said that if we even look upon a woman with lustful thought we are guilty of adultery. That has pretty much placed all us in an adulterous and sinful situation. Latter, when the Lord was brought in on the woman who was caught in the act of adultery said to those who would stone her, “let the one without sin, cast the first stone.” Christ also said that if we do not forgive others that our Father in heaven cannot forgive us. Pray for Father or anyone else that has failed you. Have the same same disposition toward him as you would like for your spouse to have toward you if your thoughts were somehow revealed. God Bless you Lisa, disappointment is a very common feeling and appropriate, but you must overcome this. His HUGE responsibility is no more than ours to matrimony. We must be ready to forgive him as our heavenly Father has forgiven us. God Bless!

  3. Jane smith says:

    Fr. Mike is a wonderful person and this will not change my opinion of him one bit. Never, never, never put clergy on a pedestal. They are human beings…just like us, and they have their demons. Clergy is held to a higher standard on many levels. But the life of a priest is not like that of a married person. They get lonely too.

  4. Sammy says:

    Forgive God would.

    • It’s not for me to forgive, I know Fr Manning not… It’s for God to forgive. But the sad reality Sammy is that sin never leaves us unaltered, and moreover, there is always punishment, and consequences for sin. Grace is not cheap!

      • Melinda Aldrian says:

        If you knew Fr. Mike, you would be first in line to help help him as a person and as a priest. He is doing God’s work…are you?

      • Grace says:

        Fr. S, I used to be a fundamentalist in my thought as a RC, meaning close-minded. But after learning more about the history of the Church and the different views of other committed Roman Catholics, be they clergy or lay, I have come to the realization that the Church is not exactly a compassionate and loving institution in the way some of the member have been treated all throughout its history, even up to the present. Priests who love – why should they be treated almost like criminals? The law of celibacy is contrary to the natural law of human beings as relational creatures – in grace and in reality. I commend those priests who are committed to celibacy, but now that I know better, I can’t be the first one to throw stones at those who break this man-made law. I don’t condone theseeming hypocrisy, but I also cannot condemn them because what have been asked of you (priests) do not conform to how God has made man. I don’t know Fr. Mike, but according to others, the service he’s done for the Church far outweighs the transgression he committed. God is the final judge, after all.

  5. kathy johnson says:

    It surprises me the posts judging Fr. Mike. Obviously you know nothing about the man or are ignorant. As a priest, you remember the scripture. Judge Not lest you be judged! Perhaps you can practice it. I have been a friend of $r. Mike’s for over 40 years

    • I am in no position to judge madam. I am above all a sinner in desperate need of grace! I simply question the flippancy of Fr Manning’s words in the face of such horrific hidden sin.

    • Melinda Aldrian says:

      Father Mike is an incredible priest and teacher. Yes, he made a mistake, but righted it himself. I am 100% BEHIND this wonderful man.

  6. Aracely says:

    These are times of faith and strength. Father Mike Manning is human, we should not be angry at him. If we truly want to be angry at someone it should be society and the way we judge others. Father Mike Manning has been there for several people in their time of need, and I am sure he has said endless prayers for several people and has heard all of our sins. Why can’t we now extend our hand to him and offer that same support he has for others. He fell into temptation, and now he asking to be freed from all difficulties. Who are we to Judge? What happen to the Apostle’s Creed:
    1. I believe in God the Father, Almighty, Maker of heaven and earth: (The only person who we need to really follow is God)

    2. And in Jesus Christ, his only begotten Son, our Lord: (no one is perfect)

    3. Who was conceived by the Holy Ghost, born of the Virgin Mary: I don’t think we have had anyone else conceived by the Holy Spirit)

    4. Suffered under Pontius Pilate; was crucified, dead and buried: He descended into hell: (Father Mike is suffering right now)

    5. The third day he rose again from the dead: (he needs time to resurrect his soul and beliefs)

    6. He ascended into heaven, and sits at the right hand of God the Father Almighty: ( Father Mike still stands behind his church and his people)

    7. From thence he shall come to judge the quick and the dead:(We are not GOD to judge him)

    8. I believe in the Holy Ghost: ( we need to forgive)

    9. I believe in the holy catholic church: the communion of saints:(we are a family of faith and need to pray for father Mike)

    10. The forgiveness of sins:

    1l. The resurrection of the body:

    12. And the life everlasting. Amen.

    take what you will from this prayer, I have nothing but faith in my religion and hope for the best for our church.

  7. Gary Beaubouef says:

    Fr. Manning’s experience of repentance and finding forgiveness reaffirms a central belief of Catholicism; that in God’s love we find forgiveness for our sins and renewal. We are able to begin again! Fr. Manning’s words are not flippant, but based on faith and hope. The truth is that grace is cheap. Indeed, it’s free, and comes abudantly to those who turn to God in repentance to seek reconciliation with him. Fr. Manning has done that.

  8. Gary Beaubouef says:

    Look at the empty tomb and consider and see the presence of new life in God.

  9. kathy johnson says:

    Unfortunately Fr. You are judging when you use the term flippant. My 14yo daughter read your comment. Her response was , “why is he judging him when Fr.Mike admitted his mistake, asked for forgiveness and CHANGED his behavior? That’s what Jesus asked us to do. I believe that is the grace that is so wonderfully easy for us as believers to receive even if people in the world who judge don’t believe we deserve it. But Jesus died to make it that way for us!!

  10. I unfortunately don’t have time to reply to every comment made on this blog, nor to get into any protracted arguments – the internet can be an ugly place that brings out the worst in otherwise good people – but just two quick replies:

    @ Kathy Johnson… You have a most perceptive daughter. However, I must emphasise that judgement is not mine. That right is reserved for God. The Church is responsible for the interpretation of His Holy Word and Will. All I’m saying is that Fr Manning has to be held fully accountable by the Church for his actions (sins) and even more so as a Priest, and man called to be faithful. He broke a sacred promise, fell into mortal sin. And sin has some really serious consequences, rupturing the relationship between God and other believers. These consequences result in punishment and satisfaction. That naturally is between Fr Manning and his confessor. Although one feels that there is a level of accountability to the rest of the faithful given his position and renown.

    @ Nina. You are ‘excused’.

    Lastly, to all: I’m not naturally given to the ‘easy-believism’ that has (sadly) pervaded the modern Church – in any form. Christ’s sacrifice simply was far too costly.

  11. Melinda Aldrian says:

    If any of you know Fr. Manning and his work, you would know what an incredible gift he is to Catholicism. Yes, he made a mistake, of which he is sorry. He broke off the relationship of his own doing years ago. The idea about it being his second cousin may make some people squirm, but marriage of second cousins is legal.
    Fr. Mike is an inspiration to many people, me included, and to know that he is fallible and makes maistakes like the rest of us makes him more human. The Catholic Church should allow marriage in diocesan positions but keep celibacy for some of its orders, ie Jesuits, Dominicans, Franciscans, etc. The church needs to allow for married priests and for women priests. That is what is the porblem, not a 70 year old priest who finds love in a woman who is beyond child bearing age.
    I support Fr. Manning now and will continue to listen to his daily messages.

  12. Paul Romans says:

    I know many Roman Catholic (“RC”) priests who live in clandestine marital relationships. The marriages may be legally confidential according to state law, or they may be between only God and the couple. Oftentimes it is what appears to be the priest/houskeeper scenario, or a spouse in a distant city. Most are older and children are not an issue. Sometimes bishops are aware of the arrangement, but say nothing until self righteous people discover the arrangement and begin to cast stones, making the situation public. The bishop must then “act” in order to protect his job.

    But how do such priests feel justified in living what appears to be a double (sinful) life? The answer lies in the concept of the “greater good.” Their ministry is more important than the RC law of celibacy.

    Can such a belief every be justified? I believe it can with the application of the doctrine of epikeia (please Google the article “Canon Law and Equity, A Tract Book” by Anthony J. Fejfar for an in depth explanation of epikeia). Epikeia in the matter of celibacy would dispense with the obligation and allow the marriage of the priest formerly committed thereto to continue his ministry, even if the marriage is only between God, the priest and his spouse.

    I strongly believe this because the imposition of celibacy for most RC priests has been to the very serious detriment of the Great Commission of Jesus to preach the Gospel to the ends of the earth. Also, the RC Church as a Eucharistic-centered church has denied the Mass/Eucharist to many of its faithful because there aren’t enough priests. And, it is against Scripture (39 popes were married, including the first pope; “bishops must be married but once” [1 Timothy 3:2]). These and many other good reasons cry out for the use of epikeia.

    Also, the celibate clerical state has long been a haven for men with sexual issues (e.g., the pedophile problem, or men trying to closet their homosexuality). Imagine what the RC church could have done with the billions it spent (and is still spending) on awards from lawsuits, legal fees and time. And what about all the priests who have been expelled? If you have a few days to peruse the list, you can find it here: http://www.bishop-accountability.org/priestdb/PriestDBbylastName-F.html. And what about the 150,000 priest who have left the active ministry because of the celibacy requirement.

    If you believe I’m off base about whether priests are celibate and straight, read the book The Changing Face of the Priesthood by Monsignor Donald Cozzens, Ph. D.

    Lastly, Catholics should understand that the history of celibacy did not happen because it is a “holy state.” Yes, St. Paul talked it up. But he also believed the Second Coming was days or weeks away. If celibacy were so holy, it would have been a sacrament. In fact, it was not until the twelfth century that priestly celibacy was imposed (Google “Letter on Marriage” by RC Jesuit priest Stephen Schloesser, Professor of History at Boston College) — because church property was being transferred to the children of priests when they died. Today it is also an excellent mechanism by which the Vatican can control its priests by keeping them in rectories and paying them practically nothing.

    There is an old concept in canon law circles: if you want to change the law, you’ve got to break the law. So leave alone Fr. Mike and the other priests who decide to marry or have relationships with women. Assume they have made good decisions in their individual consciences.

  13. Gary Beaubouef says:

    I am also not given to the “easy believism” that Fr. Smuts thinks has pervaded the Church. Indeed, one of the most difficult things to do in our faith is to forgive someone whom we feel has not only sinned against God, but through his sin has damaged something we deeply love and support, and yet, that is what our Lord has demanded of his disciples. As Fr. Smuts has said, “Christ’s sacrifice was simply far too costly” not to take our Lord’s words seriously. How often are we called to forgive? Remember our Lord’s sacrifice and remember his words. We all know the answer to that question, even if it is a difficult and painful thing to do.

  14. Rose Hardy says:

    First of all, the Bible does not require celibacy on the part of the disciples. This is a man-made law like having meatless Fridays. Secondly, Peter denied Jesus three times. Yet he became the head of the Church. Father Mike is a good person and deserves our compassion. It used to be said that by the time priests are allowed to marry, marriage will be obsolete.

    How many of us have worked daily with someone we liked and became emotionally invested in that person? You wonder why the divorce rate is so high? Did you ever wonder why the abortion rate among Catholic women is so high? Sometimes we forget reality and get on our soapbox.

    My own attitude is that desiccated old men use sex as a weapon to control others. We can forgive murder, we can forgive pedophilia but we can’t forgive love?

  15. Carol Neff says:

    During His ministry, what did Jesus say about the people He came upon, who were involved in an illicit relationship.

    He who is without sin, cast the first stone.

    Then He said, Go and sin no more.

    I believe that should be our attitude.

    The devil would love to see Fr. Mike out of his ministry as he has helped so many people. We can’t let this happen. Yes, we can hate the sin, but we are called to continue to love the sinner. The Our Father calls us to forgive others as we wish to be forgiven. It’s pretty plain what we need to do. God be with you Fr. Mike.

  16. victoria says:

    I will always remember the kindness he showed my family when he said my grandmothers funeral mass. I thank god for his presence and for the support he showed my grandfather. Loving a woman is not a sin..Father Manning and his actions are between him and god. “judge not lest ye be judged. Judgement is reserved for god alone.

  17. Usa48312 says:

    Jesus said:

    Do not judge, and you will not be judged.
    Do not condemn, and you will not be condemned.
    Forgive, and you will be forgiven.

    Dear God, please forgive Mike Manning. Have mercy on us!

  18. James R. says:

    I will pray for Father Manning. He has asked for forgiveness. We should all remember the words of St. Paul in Galatians 6:1; “Bretheren, if a man be overtaken in a fault, ye which are spiritual, restore such an one; considering thyself, lest thou also be tempted.” I cannot and will not judge this man. It is not for me to do so. We are all vunerable. God bless you, Father Manning.

  19. John Shuster says:

    Return to Active Ministry

    As of May 13, 2011, with the full support of his Provincial Superior of the Western Province of Society of the Divine Word and the Bishop of San Bernardino, Fr. Manning has moved back into full active ministry. The weekly show on the Trinity Broadcasting Network (TBN), as well as the daily smart phone app, iGodToday, sponsored by the Vatican Observatory, continue. Father is now accepting invitations for Masses and speaking engagements.

    Fr. Mike’s Calendar

    June 1 – Luncheon appt.

    June 2 – Prov Council Mtg, Riverside.

    June 7 – 3:30 appt.

    June 11 – Bl Teresa – 4 and 5:30 Masses

    June 14 – Production Day
    Elizabeth Campisi, Dennis Trittin – guests

    June 17 – 11 a.m. John of God

    June 18 – 4, 5:30 Masses, Banning

    June 19 – 7, 10:30 Masses, Banning; 8:30 St. Mary’s Morongo

    June 21 – iGod taping

    June 22 – CDC

    June 25 – 5 p.m Mass, Beaumont

    June 26 – 8, 9:45, 5 Masses, Beaumont

    June 29 – 1p.m. Glen Ellen Prison

    June 30 – Production Day
    John Swanson, painter

    http://www.wordnet.tv/news.htm

  20. yinekka says:

    Fr Manning caused a scandal and it’s not ok just because “we like him”. He broke his vow of celibacy, and his second cousin committed fornication, in a relationship which lasted for decades. His second cousin said that she had known him for 30 years; that would make her 29 and him 40. She would have been fertile at age 29 and no children issued from their sexual intimacy – I wonder why not? What a tawdry affair.

    As for those who claim
    I know many Roman Catholic (“RC”) priests who live in clandestine marital relationships”
    let them name names; it is so easy to make up something to give spurious credence to one’s opinion.

  21. Roger says:

    I talked to Fr. Manning at the SCRC convention in Anahium, CA every year. He has done great work and have brought a lot of people to Christ. The Bibe says our battle is between good and evil. Fr. Manning fell and rose up from his weakness. The speed that we forgive and move on is how fast the Lord will forgive us on judgment day.
    God Bless Fr. Manning and keep saving souls.

  22. Linda says:

    This makes me both angry and sad. This man represents the Catholic Church and yet, lived a double life for many years. Yes, we are all sinners but our priests must be held to a higher standard. They represent Christ in the Sacraments. What an honor!

    My question is this: How in the world is he still allowed to remain in active ministry when other priests have had their faculties taken away for much less? Yes, he asked for and received forgiveness BUT he caused a scandal within the Church and should, in my humble opinion, be put in a monastery to lead a life of prayer and reflection, not continue in the role of an active priest!

    • Sue says:

      I just found Fr. Mike on TBN tonight. I was impressed with his message and decided to look him up. So, he gave in to tempation, to sin like the rest of us.
      But he stopped the affair, asked for forgiveness, and I assume his spiritual advisor gave him absolution and pennace as we lay people receive in the sacrement of reconcillation. It is not for me or anyone else (this includes other priests) to judge this priest for being human! I believe that he suffered for many years with his consience as he celebrated Mass and that is and should be between him, the Pope, and GOD. As for scandal, he has caused less of a scandal than those that were involved with molesting children, and those(priest, Bishops and Cardinals) that were involved with the cover up! Linda, as for as you being angry with him, setting in judgement, are not those SINS? As the Roman Catholic Priest, who brought me into the Catholic Church six years ago, stated in one of his homilies “if you are not a sinner you do not belong in church, Jesus created His Holy Church for sinners” I am not so sure that I as a former Baptist would be welcomed in church by Fr. Smuts. I will continue to listen and learn from this good and kind priest Fr. Michael Manning. Blessings to all,

  23. Judith says:

    this again shows that Priests need to pray more and these women need to stay away from Priests. This kind of behavior cause great harm to the Church and to its people and in the long run adds to the growth of lack of trust, most Catholics are feeling towards their Priests and Nuns…

  24. Judith says:

    can one trust again a Priest who has broken his vows to God? and this women should know better if she is a true Catholic in her relationship with God…sad sad day for the Church…even sadder for Father and his Cousin

  25. Lila Cuajunco says:

    “Let him who is without sin among you cast the first stone.” On the other hand, I always thought there was something off about Father Manning. May we all rest in peace, when our time comes.

  26. Hal says:

    As a married person with children, I am not sure which issue I have with this situation is most pertinent. The loss of opportunity for either of them to marry and raise children freely, or the ongoing damage to the public opinion of Catholicism. I dont believe any of us can judge another in purity, so how can we rationally expect it in others.

  27. wisconsin Woman says:

    Let’s agree that Fr Manning is both gifted and, we’ll assume, has confessed his sin and been absolved through God’s mercy. The key question is not whether he has suffered or has consoled; it is has he loved God above all things and loved his neighbor as himself for the love of God. Every sin is a preferring of one’s own will, one’s own view to God’s. The person sinned against is God, and let’s hope Fr Manning, with a fresh sense of repentance and a renewed love for his priestly celibacy, atones with love and ever-growing trust in God for his past sin…because he wants to “shower God with love.”

  28. The first 1,100 years of the church Catholic priest were allowed to marry. The church should give priest options. The church used to have 79,000 priest in US, now somewhere around 25 -30 thousand. I agree it is better if they are strong enough to be celibate. But many cannot so let them marry. I think it is more about money because the church would have to pay there priest more with family’s. Better let them marry then live in sin.

    • William Tighe says:

      “The first 1,100 years of the church Catholic priest were allowed to marry.”

      No, they were not — never and nowhere. Married men were allowed to be ordained priests (and, of course, deacons), but they ordained were not (ever and anywhere) allowed to marry after ordination.

  29. Florence Hector says:

    If my people, which are called by my name, shall humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways; then will I hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin, and will heal their land.
    2 Chronicles 7:14

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