Fr Stephen Smuts

Archive for November 9th, 2012

Just Look At What Has Become of Syria…

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Syria in Ruins:

The rest is here [warning: there are some graphic images].

Horrific!

 

Written by Fr Stephen Smuts

November 9, 2012 at 20:30

Posted in Culture

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Archbishop of Canterbury: First Address by Justin Welby

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Let’s be quiet for a moment and then pray.

Come Holy Spirit to the hearts of your people and kindle in them the fire of your love.

To be nominated to this post is both astonishing and exciting. It is something I never expected, and the last few weeks have been a very strange experience. It is exciting because we are at one of those rare points where the tide of events is turning, and the church nationally, including the Church of England has great opportunities to match its very great but often hidden strengths. I feel a massive sense of privilege at being one of those responsible for the leadership of the church in a time of spiritual hunger, when our network of parishes and churches and schools and above all people means that we are facing the toughest issues in the toughest place.

I want to say at once that one of the biggest challenges is to follow a man who I believe will be recognised as one of the greatest Archbishops of Canterbury, Rowan Williams. He is some one with a deep love for Jesus Christ, an infectious spirituality, extraordinary integrity and holiness, immense personal moral and physical courage, and of course one of the world’s principal theologians and philosophers. On the basis that you should only follow failures, this is a great mistake. To be fully serious, the church world wide owes him a great debt, more than it knows, and I shall be continuing to seek his advice and wisdom. I can only wish him, Jane and the family a wonderful end to his time at Canterburyand joy in their new roles.

As I look back I am touched by the way in which so many people have contributed to who both Caroline and I have become. I learned a great deal from the companies in which I worked, above all from my bosses and my colleagues. We were nurtured and shaped as Christians in the churches in Paris and London. I had the privilege of serving as a curate amongst wonderful people in Nuneaton and making many mistakes as a rector in Southam. Coventry Cathedral opened my eyes to the church overseas and gave me a passion for reconciliation, andLiverpoolhumoured me, teased me and quietly taught me. Above all the providence of God has surrounded us in so many ways through tragedy and joy. Learning from other traditions than the one into which I came as a Christian has led me into the riches of Benedictine and Ignatian spirituality, the treasures of contemplative prayer and adoration, and confronted me with the rich and challenging social teaching of the Roman Catholic Church.

Looking forward, I am very conscious of my own weakness and the great need I will have for advice and wisdom, especially from those who are senior amongst the bishops who see deeply into the issues that are faced by the Church of England, and amongst the Primates who guide the Anglican Communion in its present struggles. There are some things of which I am deeply confident. Our task as part of God’s church is to worship Him in Christ and to overflow with the good news of His love for us, of the transformation that He alone can bring which enables human flourishing and joy. The tasks before us are worship and generous sharing of the good news of Christ in word and deed.

How we do those things is, of course much more complicated. The work of the Church of England is not done primarily on television or at Lambeth, but in over 16,000 churches, where hundreds of thousands of people get on with the job they have always done of loving neighbour, loving each other and giving more than 22 million hours of voluntary service outside the church a month. They are the front line, and those who worship in them, lead them, minster in them are the unknown heroes of the church. I have never had demands on me as acute as when I was a parish priest. One of the greatest privileges of this role will the inspiration of so many grass roots projects that I will see around the country. We have seen the wonderful hospitality and genius of the people in this country inside and outside the church during this marvellous year of Jubilee and Olympics.

Because of that vast company of serving Anglicans, together those in other churches, I am utterly optimistic about the future of the church. We will certainly get things wrong, but the grace of God is far greater than our biggest failures. We will also certainly get much right and do so already. Taking the right role in supporting the church as it goes on changing and adapting is the task where the collective wisdom of the bishops will be so important. The House of Bishops is very wise. I have had the great privilege of serving great bishops, Colin Bennetts in Coventry, James Jones in Liverpool and Archbishop Sentamu in York. The Archbishop has great communication gifts, wisdom and deep understanding of the global church, and I am greatly looking forward to continuing to learn from him.

The Anglican communion, for all its difficulties, is also a source of remarkable blessing to the world. In so many countries it is one of the main sharers of reconciliation and hope in Jesus Christ. Anglicans today stand firm in faith alongside other Christians under pressure in many places, especially in northern Nigeria, a country close to my heart. I am very much looking forward to meeting the Primates of the Anglican Communion, and have sent them a message today. Many of them I know already, and again have learned from them and will learn more.

Until early in the New Year I continue in Durham, and we have an Archbishop, so apart from the initial flurry I will just be doing what is in the diary already.

One of the hardest things will be to leave Durham. I work with a group of wonderful senior colleagues and remarkable clergy and lay people. It is an astonishing part of the country, one which as a family we were greatly looking forward to living in for many years. The people are direct, inspiring and wonderfully friendly. In many ways it has been the ancient cradle of British Christianity. It is a place of opportunity and an even greater future than its past. I will continue to do all I can to support the area.

This is a time for optimism and faith in the church. I know we are facing very hard issues. In 10 days or so the General Synod will vote on the ordination of women as Bishops. I will be voting in favour, and join my voice to many others in urging the Synod to go forward with this change. In my own Diocese, and before I was a Bishop, I have always recognised and celebrated the remarkable signs of God’s grace and action in the ministries of many people who cannot in conscience agree with this change. Personally I value and learn from them, and want the church to be a place where we can disagree in love, respecting each other deeply as those who belong to Christ.

We also face deep differences over the issue of sexuality. It is absolutely right for the state to define the rights and status of people co-habiting in different forms of relationships, including civil partnerships. We must have no truck with any form of homophobia, in any part of the church. The Church of England is part of the worldwide church, with all the responsibilities that come from those links. What the church does here deeply affects the already greatly suffering churches in places like northernNigeria, which I know well. I support the House of Bishop’s statement in the summer in answer to the government’s consultation on same sex marriage. I know I need to listen very attentively to the LGBT communities, and examine my own thinking prayerfully and carefully. I am always averse to the language of exclusion, when what we are called to is to love in the same way as Jesus Christ loves us. Above all in the church we need to create safe spaces for these issues to be discussed honestly and in love.

I know these are major issues and will come back to them in due course, but I will not be saying any more about that today. I will stop there before this becomes a sermon, and am happy to answer some questions.”

Written by Fr Stephen Smuts

November 9, 2012 at 16:25

Abel Beth Maacah

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HT

Written by Fr Stephen Smuts

November 9, 2012 at 16:09

Okay, So It’s ‘Official’: Justin Welby Appointed 105th Archbishop of Canterbury

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Number 10 Downing Street:

The Queen has nominated the Right Reverend Justin Welby, MA, Hon FCT, the Lord Bishop of Durham, for election by the Dean and Chapter of Canterbury in the place of the Most Reverend and Right Honourable Rowan Douglas Williams, MA DPhil DD FBA, Lord Archbishop of Canterbury, Primate of All England and Metropolitan.

Notes for Editors

Justin Welby (aged 56) was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge.  After a career in the oil industry in Paris and London, he trained for the ministry at Cranmer Hall and St John’s College Durham.  He served his title at Chilvers Coton with Astley, Coventry diocese from 1992 to 1995.  From 1995 to 2002 he was Rector of Southam and also Vicar of Ufton, Coventry diocese from 1998 to 2002.  From 2002 to 2007 he was Canon Residentiary at Coventry Cathedral; and was Co-Director for International Ministry from 2002 to 2005. From 2005 to 2007 he was Sub-Dean at Coventry Cathedral and also Canon for Reconciliation Ministry and in 2007 was also Priest-in-Charge at Coventry Holy Trinity. From 2007 to 2011 he was Dean of Liverpool. Since 2011 he has been the Bishop of Durham.

From 2000 to 2002 he was Chairman of an NHS Hospital Trust, and he currently also serves on the Committee of Reference for the ethical funds of a large investment company in the City of London.  He is also a member of the Banking Standards Commission.

Justin Welby is married to Caroline and they have had six children (one of whom died in infancy).

Written by Fr Stephen Smuts

November 9, 2012 at 13:55

St Mary’s Hollywood: The Cold Case File

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St Mary’s Hollywood: The Cold Case File Blog

is a blog run by a certain curmudgeon who frequented our blog until I had to ask him to leave simply for being rude and posting the most uncharitable of comments. I feel compelled to point out his hypocrisy too. This was a comment he placed over here shortly before leaving:

Well, as Fr Wheeler pointed out above, things have certainly turned nasty here. The question I have is really why Fr Smuts fosters this sort of thing — there was no new news in it, since the court order was issued weeks previously. So with nothing new, Fr Smuts decides to stir up some…

Fr Smuts, frankly, I think what you’re doing here, creating the conditions for a foodfight, is a disgrace…

So what does he do? Gets banned and goes out and opens his own little blog with the sole purpose of starting ‘a foodfight,’ only, he’s the one throwing all the ‘food’ around by publicly attacking, slandering and maligning his ecclesiastical opponents. Pure argumentum ad hominem, and the first pair to bear the brunt of his wrath are Bishop Strawn and Canon Anthony Morello.

Come to think of it, I’d better watch out too, for who knows, I may be next? Mercifully I have nothing to do with St Mary’s, Hollywood, or the USA for that matter, and the best he could come up with (previously) was a pathetically infantile attempt at sarcastically insulting my name and saying that I stay in some ‘cultural backwater.’ Shame. But do feel free to Google all you will Sir (cf. Prov 16:27), you’ll find nothing… I’m sorry to disappoint but there just ain’t any skeletons in this closet. Far better bloggers than you have snuffled around and still, they come back empty-handed.

Honestly, you know, if this is the basis for starting a blog, then the only place it will go is the way of all the other blogs that so fill themselves with venom, slander and unruliness, and that is: Nowhere. Cyber-oblivion awaits…

UPDATE:  It continues with: I’m Unable to Locate a Bio for Bishop Straw.

 

Written by Fr Stephen Smuts

November 9, 2012 at 13:43

Are you on Twitter Yet?

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Perhaps you should be? Wise are Church leaders who embrace social media and use it for the good of the Gospel. I once found myself laughing out aloud when I read a certain, err… shall we use that word and say, Church leader (?) in a letter to the people openly condemning blogs and the like. He huffed and puffed – and this while other Church leaders (like the Pope for example) actively encourage their priests to blog (and use other forms of communication and social media) – and all I could think at the time was: Wake up! No wonder his ministry is in disarray…

Anyway, the news I want to share in this post, speaking of the Pope, is that I see he will soon be opening a personal Twitter account. That’s according to Vatican spokesman Fr Federico Lombardi:

Pope Benedict XVI will join the Twitter-sphere, tweeting from a personal account along with the world’s celebrities, leaders and ordinary folk.

Vatican spokesman the Rev. Federico Lombardi made the announcement Thursday, saying details about Benedict’s handle and other information will come when the Vatican officially launches the account, perhaps before the end of the year.

The 85-year-old Benedict sent his first tweet from a Vatican account last year when he launched the Vatican’s news information portal, aimed at the world’s 1.1 billion Catholics. The new Twitter account will be his own, though it’s doubtful Benedict himself will wrestle down his encyclicals, apostolic exhortations and other papal pronouncements into 140-character bites…

Written by Fr Stephen Smuts

November 9, 2012 at 12:40

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