Women’s Ordained Ministry Has Not Stemmed C of E Decline

 

Archbishop Cranmer takes a look.

 

Nashotah House and Bishopess Jefferts-Schori

Nashotah House is an Anglo-Catholic seminary. So there’s a bit of a hullabaloo over Katherine Jefferts Schori’s invitation to the institution.  Anyway, I see they have a statement out.


 

On Continuing Anglican Unity

Fr Anthony Chadwick has a look.

… Indeed, we look forward to the fortieth anniversary of the Congress of Saint Louis, and to much progress having been made to recover from bad experience in this process of Christian healing and reconciliation.

Read the rest of his thoughts here.

 

Men Banned from Becoming Queen…

as 700 years of law redrafted ahead of gay marriage. You just can’t make this stuff up!

Men are to be banned from becoming Queen or Princess of Wales as part of an unprecedented effort to rewrite more than 700 years of law to prevent unintended consequences of gay marriage.

Even a 14th Century act declaring it high treason to have an affair with the monarch’s husband or wife is included in the sweeping redrafting exercise.

Civil servants have drawn up a list of scores of statutes and regulations dating back as far 1285 to be amended or specifically excluded when the Government’s Same-Sex Marriage Act comes into force next month.

Under proposals to be debated by MPs and Peers as early as next week, terms such as “widow” will be deleted or reworded in legislation covering topics as diverse as seamen’s pensions and London cab licences to take account of the new definition of marriage.

References to mothers, fathers, husbands and wives are also to be amended to avoid future confusion.

Rest here.

Avoid confusion?! More like creating it.

The order makes clear that a clause in the Act giving gay and heterosexual   marriage the same legal effect does not apply to the rights of anyone “who marries, or who is married to, the King Regnant, to the title of Queen”.

It also makes clear that were a future Prince of Wales to marry a man his husband could not be called Princess of Wales.

More immediately, the order rules out the possibility of Dukes, Earls and   other male peers who marry other men making their husbands Duchess, Countess or Lady…

 

Parish Makes A Stand Against Church of England Leaders

On same sex blessings:

Times Series: Church rector James Mustard said he expects his parish to release a statement opposing the House of Bishops in the coming weeks

 An East Barnet vicar says his parish is preparing to challenge Church of England leaders after they reiterated their ban on blessing same-sex couples.

The House of Bishops, which governs practice in Anglican churches across England, earlier this month rejected recommendations that it lifts its ban on blessing gay couples.

But the parish of St Mary’s Church in East Barnet says it plans to lodge a protest against the decision and write a formal letter once its members have met later this month.

The parish is a supporting member of Inclusive Church, an organisation campaigning for the acceptance of minorities including lesbian, gay, bi-sexual and transgender couples and individuals.

Same-sex marriages are currently banned inside the Church of England, which is governed by its own historic laws, but some believe it should go some way towards lessening its discrimination by allowing the blessing of gay couples in churches.

Members of the St Mary’s Church council now plan to meet and formulate a statement in response to the House of Bishop’s latest refusal to be moved on the subject.

Church rector James Mustard said he expects his parish to release the statement in the coming weeks and says it is an important subject for the image and ministry of his church in the area.

He said: “The feeling is that this ongoing prohibition on blessing same-sex couples is harmful to our relationship with the community, whether they come to the church or not.

“I think it is important that churches in favour of supporting same-sex couples with blessings should speak out, and we’re preparing to issue a statement opposing the House of Bishops’ decision.”

 

To Be a Christian: An Anglican Catechism

Which has been produced by The Anglican Communion of North America:The Anglican Church in North America

The Catechesis Task Force is pleased to announce that To Be a Christian: An Anglican Catechism is now available in PDF and Microsoft Word format.

The Catechism was unanimously approved for use by the College of Bishops on January 8th, 2014.

This catechism (a text used for instruction of Christian disciples) is designed as a resource manual for the renewal of Anglican catechetical practice. It presents the essential building blocks of classic catechetical instruction: the Apostles’ Creed, the Lord’s Prayer, and the Ten Commandments (the Decalogue). To these is added an initial section especially intended for those with no prior knowledge of the Gospel. Each section is presented in the question-and-answer form that became standard in the sixteenth-century because of its proven effectiveness. Each section is also set out with its practical implications, together with biblical references.

Access the Catechism here.

I see Dr J.I. Packer was involved. Worth checking out.

 

Have We Lost the Battle?

…Is it actually relevant in a modern world and should a Christian fight for his or her right to visibly exercise their faith in the secular world?

Some Christian writers, bloggers, and would-be spokesmen have suggested that we have lost the sexual battles and need to get over it and move on: lost on the pre-marital sex issue, lost on the multi-divorce-remarriage issue, lost on the homosexual-bisexual-transgender issues, and certainly the homosexual marriage issue as well. The advocates of this position point to the changes both in culture and law that are taking place in Europe and North America, and these advocates seem to take the Anglo-centric view that what Europe and North America do is of course superior to what other continents, nations, cultures and peoples might think, believe or practice. The truth is, until very recently the entire Christian church family agreed on moral standards for individuals, family and marriage, and the battle for the Judeo-Christian understanding of marriage and family is anything but lost on a global basis. While many western denominations are rapidly declining in attendance and vitality, non-western Christian churches are booming…

Read on at the American Anglican Council.

Anglican Synod of Bishops to Meet

The Synod of Bishops of the Anglican Church of Southern Africa will meet at a conference centre in Bela Bela in Limpopo next week.

Hosted by the Diocese of St Mark the Evangelist, the meeting will hear from a number of outside speakers and consider a range of important issues in church life.

Vistors to the Synod will include General Bantu Holomisa of the United  Democratic Movement, who will speak on leadership and planning, Ms Hendrietta Ipeleng Bogopane-Zulu, the Deputy Minister for Women, Children and Persons with Disability, who will address issues including the accessibility of churches to the disabled.

Church business to be dealt with will include: the training of new bishops; a new Anglican Prayer Book; developments in theological education; and the Growing the Church outreach, including the Anglicans Ablaze conference this year.

Source

 

Archbishop Cranmer and the Prayerbook Tradition

 

Congregations Expect to Grow, But Few Parish Members Invite Others to Worship

In the Church Times:Click to enlarge

Only one quarter of Anglicans who responded to a Church Times survey are in the habit of inviting people to church.

Just 27 per cent of laypeople responding to a questionnaire agreed with the proposition: “I often invite other people to come to my church”; 56 per cent disagreed. Six per cent agreed with the proposition: “I would never invite anyone to come to my church.” …

The clergy, naturally enough, came out as more active evangelists. More than half, 53 per cent, often invited people to church, although 33 per cent admitted that they did not.

Four per cent of clergy respondents said that they would never invite anyone to their church (the survey attracted responses from retired clerics as well as incumbents). Half the clergy respondents expected their church to grow in the next 12 months.

They were less sanguine about the experience of newcomers, however. One quarter of the clergy agreed with the proposition: “It is not easy for newcomers in my church”; 52 per cent disagreed. For the laity, the figures were 19 per cent and 57 per cent…

The whole piece can be read here.

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 825 other followers