Culture

Terry Jones May Put Mohammed on Trial

Terry Jones, the radical pastor who oversaw the burning of a Koran in his Florida church last month after a mock court hearing, may put the Islamic prophet Mohammed on trial in his next ‘day of judgement’, he told The Sunday Telegraph.

“It is definitely a consideration to stage a trial on the life of Mohammed in the future,” he said in interview on Saturday.

Such an inflammatory move would almost certainly trigger further violent protests in the Muslim world. But Mr Jones struck an unapologetic stance, insisting that his actions bore no responsibility for the murders in Mazar-i-Sharif…

Read the rest here.

The man has lost it completely.
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Church

Catholic Bishop Called a ‘Pedophile Pimp’

By an American politician:

New Hampshire’s House Republican leader has used Facebook to lash out at Bishop John McCormack, who opposed the state budget cut plan, calling him a “pedophile.”

The Roman Catholic cleric vocally opposed the budget plan on Thursday on the basis that it would hurt “the most vulnerable in our society.”

In a post on the social networking site on Friday, David J. Bettencourt asked whether McCormack would like to discuss his history of protecting the vulnerable, CNN reported.

“This man [McCormack] is a pedophile pimp who should have been led away from the State House in handcuffs with a rain coat over his head in disgrace. He has absolutely no moral credibility to lecture anyone,” Bettencourt said.

New Hampshire GOP Chairman Jack Kimball said in a Friday statement that he was disappointed with Bettencourt’s post and that he did not share the House Leader’s sentiments.

McCormack is the bishop of the Diocese of Manchester. The diocese came under criticism in 2003 when it was forced to settle over 170 lawsuits alleging sexual abuse by priests in New Hampshire.

I’m afraid that Facebook has become a popular out let for some really completely unacceptable vitriolic attacks like the one above.

Culture

SA Police Services Chief Likens Police Force to Jesus and His 12 Apostles

Times Live reports on police chief Bheki Cele recent comments:

He said that if even Jesus and God had criminals in their midst, it was to be expected that there would be criminals in the 193,000-strong police force, Beeld newspaper reported on Saturday.

“Jesus Christ had an organisation of 12 people… among those 12 there was a criminal who sat with Jesus every day,” Cele was quoted as saying at a police cars handover ceremony in Pretoria on Friday.

“Even when Jesus berated him [Judas], he denied that it was him who was a criminal.

“In the Garden of Eden, there were two people. God himself did an inspection every morning. One day, He could not find them. They were hiding, because they had committed a crime,” he said.

“If you will find criminals amongst two people, then you will find criminals in an organisation with 193,000 members,” Cele said.

Beeld said that in the past seven months, some 254 police members in Gauteng were arrested for alleged involvement in robberies and corruption.

Top cop Richard Mdluli and several of his colleagues were arrested this week for their alleged involvement in a murder that was committed in the late 1990s.

This is not the first biblical comparison used in SA politics.

President Jacob Zuma was criticised a few years ago for saying the African National Congress will rule until Jesus comes.

In 2008, a provincial ANC leader likened Zuma’s suffering in the then corruption case against him to what Jesus had gone through.

Church

EWTN Pulls Fr John Corapi Programs

Out of respected for Church authority:

The Eternal Word Television Network said its decision to halt programming by the popular speaker Fr. John Corapi followed the lead of legitimate Church authority.

“EWTN has an obligation to uphold the discipline and teachings of the Church,” president Michael Warsaw said on April 1. “In the network’s thirty years of existence, our practice has always been to discontinue airing programs featuring any cleric whose priestly faculties have been suspended, even if temporarily,” Warsaw said.

EWTN pulled Fr. Corapi’s programs following the priest’s announcement on Ash Wednesday that he has been publicly accused of drug abuse and sexual relationships with several women. Fr. Corapi has denied the allegations.

In the weeks since then, EWTN has come under intense criticism for its decision.
 
In his statement, Warsaw said that much of that criticism has been “shrill and uncharitable.” He said that many people have threatened to withhold donations and have made personal remarks attacking the network’s employees.

“When I see messages and web postings that malign the character and intentions of people who have served this mission for years, often at great personal sacrifice, I cannot allow those assertions to stand unanswered,” he said.

Warsaw stressed that it “is simply illogical to assert, as some have, that the very people who have worked personally with Fr. John over the years and who have made certain that he has had a continued presence on EWTN would suddenly and immediately take league with the enemy and turn against him.”

Fr. Corapi was suspended from priestly ministry on March 18 by his superiors in the Texas-based Society of Our Lady of the Most Holy Trinity.

A three-page letter submitted by a former, unidentified female employee claimed that the 63-year-old priest took part in sexual encounters with several adult women and engaged in habitual drug use. Fr. Corapi said in a March 19 statement that the accusations were entirely “false.” 

In response to the allegations, the television network pulled the broadcast of Fr. Corapi’s homilies and teachings until further notice.

“In this case, Fr. John’s own religious superior has made the determination to place him on administrative leave and feels it best that Fr. John not exercise public ministry at this time,” Warsaw said.

“Fr. Corapi’s religious superior obviously believes that this was the prudent and appropriate course of action.”

Warsaw said that although the network does not know the details of the case, “as Catholics, we are obliged to give deference and the benefit of the doubt to the religious superior who does know.”

“A priest,” the network CEO noted, “has no right to public ministry in the Church on his own. He cannot function publicly without the express permission of his bishop or religious superior. That is the discipline of the Church.”

Warsaw emphasized that EWTN had “an obligation to remove Fr. John’s programming from the air” and that the decision was reached with “much prayer and careful consideration.”

“Some have said this showed a lack of courage by the network,” he said. But, he countered, the “hard decision was to remove the programs.”

“Fr. John is not just a face on television or a voice on the radio to those of us here at EWTN. He is a man many of us know personally and admire greatly. That made the decision all the more difficult for us.”

Warsaw also underscored the network’s stance that Fr. Corapi “is absolutely innocent of any and all charges unless proven otherwise by the investigation that is now underway.”

“I have been privileged to know Fr. John for more than a decade. He is a gifted preacher and has done tremendous work leading souls to Christ. That is a fact.”

“Fr. John has asked us to pray for all involved,” Warsaw said. “That is what we are doing. I would also ask our EWTN Family to continue to pray that this matter will be resolved quickly and that Fr. John’s programs can be returned to the airwaves.”