Culture

UN Now Urges Eating Insects

Via AFP:

Beetles, caterpillars and wasps could supplement diets around the world as an environmentally friendly food source if only Western consumers could get over their “disgust”, the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) said on Monday.

“The main message is really: ‘Eat insects'”, Eva Mueller, director of forest economics at the FAO, told a press conference in Rome.

“Insects are abundant and they are a valuable source of protein and minerals,” she said.

“Two billion people — a third of the world’s population — are already eating insects because they are delicious and nutritious,” she said.

Also speaking at the press conference was Gabon Forestry Minister Gabriel Tchango who said: “Insect consumption is part of our daily life.”

He said some insects — like beetle larvae and grilled termites — were considered delicacies.

“Insects contribute about 10 percent of animal protein consumed by the population,” he said.

The report said insect farming was “one of the many ways to address food and feed insecurity”.

“Insects are everywhere and they reproduce quickly, and they have high growth and feed conversion rates and a low environmental footprint…

Rest here.

More like bottom feeding.

 

Advertisements
Church

Catholic Population

The Vatican’s annual headcount shows 1.214 billion Catholics worldwide.

Vatican statistics released today show that the number of Asian and African Catholics is continuing its upward trajectory, while the Church in Europe is still shrinking.

The number of religious excluding priests has risen 18.5 percent in Africa and a whopping 44.9 percent in Asia in just 10 years, according to the 2013 Pontifical Yearbook.

The Yearbook, which was published May 13 and contains data from 2011, revealed Catholics still make up less than 18 percent of the world’s population, but the Church is growing the fastest in Africa and Asia.

And although it shows “a strong downward trend was observed in data for the professed religious women with a decrease of 10 percent from 2001 to 2011,” there has also been “a sustained increase” with over 28 percent in Africa and 18 percent in Asia.

The Yearbook states that although the number of Catholics in the world increased by just 1.5 percent from 2010 to 2011, it increased by 4.3 percent in Africa and 2 percent in Asia.

The total number of Catholics that were baptized in 2011 had the highest representation in the Americas at 48.8 percent, followed by Europe with 23.5 percent, Africa was at 16 percent, Asia had 10.9 percent and Oceania came in at just under one percent.

“The dynamics of the number of priests in Africa and Asia is somewhat comforting,” says the document.

It reports that there were over 3,000 new priests in the two continents in 2011 and that in 10 years the numbers increased by 39.5 percent in Africa and 32 percent in Asia.

“America remains stationary around an average of 122,000 priests and Europe, in contrast to the global average, has seen a decrease of 9 percent in the past decade,” the Yearbook says.

Another surprising fact is that the number of permanent deacons has also boomed, especially in Europe and the United States, increasing by over 40 percent in the last 10 years.

The Vatican Secretary of State Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone and the Substitute for General Affairs Archbishop Angelo Becciu presented the Yearbook on May 13 to Pope Francis.

It was edited by several people, including Monsignor Vittorio Formenti, head of the Central Bureau of Statistics of the Church, and Enrico Nenna, the chief statistician in the Vatican’s Central Office for Church Statistics.

The number of Catholics worldwide has remained steady at 1.214 billion for the year 2011.

 

Culture

Burger King Opens In South Africa, Minus The Bacon

The company that gave America the Bacon Sundae opened with a big splash in South Africa – but no bacon.

Burger King South Africa CEO Jaye Sinclair says people lined up for hours at the weekend launch in the coastal resort of Cape Town.

But a few customers called Talk Radio 702 Monday to complain there were no bacon dishes and ask why the company was catering to a minority. Sinclair said the company respects South Africa’s multicultural society and doesn’t want to limit its customers.

Official South African statistics show that religious groups that do not eat pork here include 11 percent of the 48 million people who belong to the indigenous Zion Christian Church, Muslims making up 1.5 percent of the population and Jews 0.2 percent…

Source