Church

Katharine Jefferts Schori: Diversity, Not Jesus, Saves

The Presiding heretic:

The Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church has denounced the Apostle Paul as mean-spirited and bigoted for having released a slave girl from demonic bondage as reported in Acts 16:16-34 .

In her sermon delivered at All Saints Church in Curaçao in the diocese of Venezuela, Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori condemned those who did not share her views as enemies of the Holy Spirit.

The presiding bishop opened her remarks with an observation on the Dutch slave past. “The history of this place tells some tragic stories about the inability of some to see the beauty in other skin colors or the treasure of cultures they didn’t value or understand,” she said.

She continued stating: “Human beings have a long history of discounting and devaluing difference, finding it offensive or even evil.  That kind of blindness is what leads to oppression, slavery, and often, war.  Yet there remains a holier impulse in human life toward freedom, dignity, and the full flourishing of those who have been kept apart or on the margins of human communities.”

Read it all in Anglican Ink.

 

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Church

Continuing Anglicanism

Wikipedia has modified their page on Continuing Anglicanism and it makes for rather interesting reading:

The Continuing Anglican movement encompasses a number of Christian churches in various countries that profess Anglicanism while remaining outside the Anglican Communion. These churches generally believe that “traditional” forms of Anglican faith and worship have been unacceptably revised or abandoned within some Anglican Communion churches in recent decades. They claim, therefore, that they are “continuing” or preserving Anglicanism’s line of Apostolic Succession as well as historic Anglican belief and practice.

The modern “Continuing” movement principally dates to the 1977 Congress of St. Louis in the United States, at which meeting participants rejected the ordination of women and the changes that had been made in the Episcopal Church’s Book of Common Prayer.

Much more here.