Church

School Chaplain Dismissed for Calling Homosexuality a ‘Disorder’

He is a Church of Scotland minister.

… The Rev Donald MacInnes made the comments on a Facebook page seen by some parents of pupils at the Glasgow Gaelic School.

They complained to the city council over the remarks, with one describing them as “absolutely disgraceful”.

Mr MacInnes made the comments while criticising the Scottish Government’s plans to legalise same-sex marriage.

He said: “The overwhelming support of our Scottish politicians in creating same-sex marriage is very disappointing.

“Many of us, myself included, agreed that the creation of civil partnerships was necessary so that individuals suffering from this disorder were not legally penalised in any way because of their sexuality.

“We can now expect to see the school curriculum changed to the end that our children will be taught this perversion as if it were a good thing.”…

A spokesman for Glasgow City Council said that while the minister was entitled to his opinions, action had been taken because his views “were not in keeping with the ethos of the school”, and the council had a duty of care to the pupils.

She added: “The man is no longer the chaplain at the school and this decision was taken by the head teacher as soon as we received the complaints from parents and reviewed the situation.

“The school did receive complaints from some parents about the inappropriate comments made and a decision was taken to review the religious observance at the school.”

The school, near Charing Cross, provides Gaelic education for pre-school, primary and secondary pupils.

Donald Brown, chair of the parent council for the school, said the remarks were not in line with its stance on equality.

Mr MacInnes, the minister of Gairbraid Church in Maryhill, Glasgow, is originally from the Isle of Lewis. He refused to comment on the matter.

A spokesman for the Church of Scotland said it respected the right of head teachers to appoint the chaplain of their choice, adding: “We hope that this right will continue to be exercised with due regard to freedom of religious expression in a non-inflammatory way.”

He said the church was sorry the Rev MacInnes was no longer the chaplain…

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Culture

We Need To Talk About TED

In the Guardian:

Science, philosophy and technology run on the model of American Idol – as embodied by TED talks – is a recipe for civilisational disaster…

TED talks in Edinburgh : Alain de Botton

Read the rest of the observations made here.

I must say that I quite like TED and have seen (and even posted here on the blog) some rather inspiring, interesting, and stimulating  talks.

 

Bible Archaeology

Dispute Over Oldest Inscription Found in Jerusalem

If correct, the decryption attests to an organized administration and system in which people were literate, and had a system for classifying wine by quality.

Haaretz:

A possible decryption of the oldest inscription ever found at an archaeological site in Jerusalem has interesting implications. If correct, the decryption attests to an organized administration and system in which people were literate, and had a system for classifying wine by quality.

The inscription was found in the Ophel area, south of the Temple Mount, at an archaeological dig run by Dr. Eilat Mazar, from the Archaeological Institute at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

The inscription, uncovered six months ago, is etched into a remnant of what was a large clay pitcher, and is eight letters long. It is dated to the second half of the 10th century BCE, the days of King Solomon.

Most scholars who have examined the inscription determined that it was written in an ancient near eastern language, and not in Hebrew.

An article recently published by Professor Gershon Galil from the department of Jewish History at Haifa University, however, suggests a new analysis of the inscription.

Galil suggests that it is written in ancient Hebrew. “The writing itself is unimportant, in Europe, there are currently many languages that use Latin letters,” explains Galil. The word that Galil deciphered, which suggests that the inscription is written in ancient Hebrew is “yayin,” which means wine.

“Here we see the word ‘yayin.’ When you check how all the languages from that period and region wrote ‘wine,’ you see they wrote it with one ‘yud,’ – the same in Samarian northern Hebrew. The Phoenicians wrote it the same way as well. Aside from the southern Hebrew of that time, even the scrolls found in Qumran preserve the same spelling of the word,” explains Galil.

According to Galil, the inscription should be read “in the year [… ]M, wine, part, m[…]”

Galil posits that the inscription can be divided into three parts that describe the wine stored in the pitcher. The first letter is a final “mem”, perhaps the end of the word for twenty or thirty – as in the twentieth or thirtieth year of the kingdom of Solomon. “Wine part” is the kind of wine, and the “mem” represents the place from which it was brought to Jerusalem.

“Wine part” is a term that is known from the Ugarit language from northern Syria, which is the lowest of three categories used to define wine: “good wine,” “no good,” and “partial.”

“This wine wasn’t served to Solomon’s emissaries, or in the temple, but apparently was for the slave construction workers who worked in the area,” says Galil.

From other, later sources, archaeologists know that the low quality wine was given to soldiers or forced laborers. The fact that the wine was of low quality is also logical considering that it was stored in a large vessel that did not keep it very fresh.

This new theory regarding the inscription will no doubt cause a big stir among the archaeological community, regarding the periods of Kings David and Solomon. Many archaeologists claim that during biblical times, Jerusalem was not a large or important city, despite the way it was described in Biblical literature.

Professor Galil and other supporters of the Biblical accounts see the Bible as a historical document, and this particular interpretation of the inscription supports the existence of a complex administrative system, as well as a hierarchical society with regulated shipping from far off places. These claims support the Biblical version of the story, which describes Jerusalem as a large, important city, that ruled over significant kingdoms.

The inscription, according to researchers who support the Biblical version of the history, supports the theory that Jerusalem expanded during King Solomon’s time, from the City of David to the Temple Mount.

 

Church

President Zuma Pays for New Zulu Translation of the Bible

iol news:IOL pic dec12 jacob zuma glasses on file

The Roman Catholic Church and the Jacob Zuma Foundation have embarked on a mission to ensure the correct translation of the Bible from the original Greek and Hebrew to Zulu.

The undertaking is expected to take at least three years, to ensure that it is accurate and that there are no omissions – as happened when it was translated from English.

On Sunday, President Jacob Zuma donated R500 000 on behalf of the foundation to complete the task started by Bishop Mlungisi Dlungwane of Mariannhill in KwaZulu-Natal.

He attended mass at the Mariannhill Mission with businessman Patrice Motsepe, MEC for Education Peggy Nkonyeni, MEC for Agriculture Meshack Radebe and eThekwini mayor James Nxumalo.

Zuma applauded the 32 people who would undertake the task, saying it would change people’s lives.

He commended the church for its role in protecting the community from poverty, adding that it also played a  role in hospitals and schools.

“The Bible is a holy book. That is why believers should get the gist of it as it is, and it needs to be translated properly,” Zuma said.

“Zulu should not climb on top of other languages, but what is written should be translated directly from that language into Zulu.”

Zuma encouraged business people to contribute money to the project.

He also urged the congregation to register to vote and those without ID books to apply for them.

“I would not be doing my job if I didn’t encourage you to register to vote. We fought against apartheid; now we must fight the challenges that are facing the country.”

Dlungwane thanked Zuma for the donation.

 

Church

The Congress of St Louis Recordings

Bishop Chandler Holder Jones points out the historic recordings of The Congress of St Louis :

The Congress was arguably the seminal event in the formation of the Continuing Anglican Church movement, and was certainly one of the most important events in the contemporary history of Anglicanism…

Wikipedia has more by way of info on the conference here.