Culture

President Jacob Zuma Admitted to Hospital

Photo of: President Jacob ZumaHere’s the official word from the Presidency:

President Jacob Zuma has today, 07 June 2014, been admitted to hospital for tests.

Yesterday President Zuma was advised to rest following a demanding election and transition programme to the new administration.

Doctors are satisfied with his condition.

Enquiries: Mac Maharaj on 079 879 3203 or macmaharaj@icloud.com

Issued by the Presidency.

The Telegraph has more:

South Africa’s President Jacob Zuma was on Saturday admitted to hospital for tests following a bout of exhaustion, his office said.

“Doctors are satisfied with his condition,” his office said in a statement without giving details.

Mr Zuma’s spokesman, Mac Maharaj, told AFP the president has been advised to get some rest, but “there is no cause for concern. It’s a case of exhaustion.”

On Friday Mr Zuma “was advised to rest following a demanding election and transition programme to the new administration,” said the presidency.

“It’s been a hectic period and there has been a need for some rest,” added Mr Maharaj.

Two weeks ago, Mr Zuma, 72 was sworn in for a second term after his African National Congress (ANC) party won the May 7 elections with an overwhelming 62 percent of the vote.

 

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Church

Islamic Prayers to be Held at Vatican, For the First Time in History

Islamic prayers are to be held at the Vatican this Sunday. Pentecost Sunday.

For the first time in history, Islamic prayers and readings from the Quran will be heard at the Vatican on Sunday, in a move by Pope Francis to usher in peace between Israelis and Palestinians…

Holy See officials on Friday said the evening prayers would be a “pause in politics” and had no political aim other than to rekindle the desire for Israeli-Palestinian peace at the political and popular level, according to the Associated Press….

The Vatican will broadcast a live feed of the event to viewers across the world.

Then there is the official statement from the Vatican:

(Vatican Radio) At a press conference in the Vatican on Friday, the head of the Holy See’s press office, Fr Federico Lombardi, and the Franciscan Custos of the Holy Land, Fr Pierbattista Pizzaballa, announced details of a prayer encounter to be held on Sunday with the presidents of Israel and Palestine. Also attending the event will be the spiritual leader of the Orthodox world, Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew of Constantinople.

Pope Francis invited Israeli President Shimon Peres and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas to the encounter on May 25th during his brief but intense visit to the Holy Land.

“Building peace is difficult, but living without peace is a constant torment.” Those were Pope Francis’ words to the Israeli and Palestinian presidents when he invited them to come to the Vatican to join him in “heartfelt prayer to God for the gift of peace.” Both leaders immediately accepted that invitation and will be arriving in the Vatican around 6.30pm on Sunday evening, accompanied by delegations of about 20 people representing the different faith communities present in both states. Also taking part in the Vatican delegation will be the Orthodox Patriarch who played such a central role in the Pope’s recent pilgrimage to Jerusalem to recall a similar encounter between their predecessors exactly half a century ago.

Following a brief welcome in the Casa Santa Marta where he lives, Pope Francis will accompany the two presidents and the patriarch through the Vatican gardens to a specially prepared venue surrounded by two tall hedges between the Pontifical Academy of Sciences building and a wing of the Vatican museums.

Fr Lombardi explained that each faith community will present a piece of music, then thank God for the gift of creation, ask forgiveness for sins committed and pray for the gift of peace. Pope Francis and the two presidents will add their own calls for peace in the region, before exchanging greetings, planting an olive tree as a visible symbol of their desire for an end to the conflict and sharing a moment of private conversation together.

Answering journalists’ questions about the aim of the encounter, Fr Pizzaballa said it is a purely religious event designed to provide space for people to stand back from the conflict and “recreate a desire for change”. While the meeting will not lead to any overnight solutions to the complex problems of the Middle East, Fr Pizzaballa said he hoped it might just reopen a path of dialogue and allow people to dream of a world where peace really is possible.

Between two tall hedges…

 

Church

When Is A Priest Not A Priest?

Apparently, when he’s molesting a child. So says a Diocese in defence of a lawsuit.Chris-Naples-Terence-McAlinden.jpg

Chris Naples says something snapped inside him that January day.

The Burlington County man sat in the gallery of the Delaware Supreme Court, watching as a lawyer for the Diocese of Trenton told the justices that the Rev. Terence McAlinden was not “on duty” — or serving in his capacity as a priest — when he allegedly molested Naples on trips to Delaware in the 1980s.

McAlinden, who once headed the diocese’s youth group, had introduced himself to Naples at a church-sponsored leadership retreat in Keyport. He’d heard his confession, included him in private Masses and discussed matters of spirituality with him.

Yet McAlinden wasn’t officially a priest when he took a teenage Naples to Delaware, the lawyer argued.

“How do we determine when a priest is and is not on duty?” one of the justices asked, according to a video of the session on the court’s website.

“Well,” replied the diocese lawyer, “you can determine a priest is not on duty when he is molesting a child, for example. … A priest abusing a child is absolutely contrary to the pursuit of his master’s business, to the work of a diocese.”

The statement — one prong of the diocese’s argument that it should not be held responsible for McAlinden’s alleged assaults — left Naples reeling.

“Any hope I had that the church was concerned about me as a victim or about the conduct of its priests was totally gone,” Naples, now 42, said in a recent interview. “They were washing their hands of it. I was shattered. I just couldn’t believe that was one of their arguments.”

Rest here. It makes for sad reading.