Church

On Dealing With Criticism

From an e-mail over at The New Continuing Anglican Churchman blog:

… So, after ten years of full time parish ministry, I have learned that clergy should not bother responding to e-mails like this. Because no matter the response, people with this attitude are not going to change their ways, and have a spiritual revival, and start coming to church, and supporting the ministry, etc. I’ve heard of innumerable troubles that clergy invite on themselves by answering people like this… spiritually dead people with hardened hearts. It is best for clergy to focus their energy on the people in their church who are responding positively and build the church from there. When repeated efforts to teach people fail – because they are not around, and don’t read anything you send – the only thing that you can do is pray for them, as taking them seriously any other way could put them in spiritual danger.

You can read the whole mail here. Sound advice.

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Biblical Archaeology

World’s Oldest Bible On Show

Which we known as Codex Sinaiticus. At the British Museum:

… One of the highlights is part of the 4th century Codex Sinaiticus, a book written in Greek on animal skin by monks on Mount Sinai, and which contains the oldest complete copy of the New Testament.

“It is without question the most important book in Britain. It is a remarkable chance to see it in the context of the world in which it was made,” said British Museum director Neil MacGregor…

More info here.

 

Culture

China Ends One-Child Family Policy

 

The barbaric social engineering experiment has ended. The low birth rate has resulted in an ageing population.

The Catholic Herald:

China has ended its one-child policy after three decades.

The ruling Communist Party has said it will ease family planning restrictions, allowing couples to have two children.

It is thought the one-child policy has prevented about 400million births since it was introduced.

The controversial policy was introduced nationally three decades ago in 1978 with the aim of tackling China’s rapidly growing population.

It faced global criticism when it was brought in, as critics suggested it was an abuse of people’s human rights.

Those who violated the policy faced a range of punishments, from fines to loss of employment or forced abortions.

While the restrictions reduced the country’s birth rate, it has seen a rise in the relative number of elderly people.

Now, amid concerns over China’s ageing population, the party has bowed to activist’s call for change.

The policy had been relaxed in some areas, as sociologists began to raise concerns about rising social costs and falling worker numbers.

The rules were not formally relaxed by the Communist Party until two years ago, when it allowed couples in which at least one of the pair is an only child, and those who had a girl, to have a second.