Why the Media Doesn’t Cover Jihadist Attacks on Middle East Christians

“To their loss they are crucifying the Son of God all over again and subjecting Him to public disgrace”—Hebrews 6:6

The United Nations, Western governments, media, universities, and talking heads everywhere insist that Palestinians are suffering tremendous abuses from the state of Israel.  Conversely, the greatest human rights tragedy of our time—radical Muslim persecution of Christians, including in Palestinian controlled areas—is devotedly ignored.

The facts speak for themselves.

And you can read them here.

 

Israel Tightens Airspace Rules

Hat tip to Irish Anglican, Fr Rob.

Ben Gurion Airport

Jewish Press is reporting:

Israel has tightened airspace rules for aircraft entering Israeli airspace according to a report on Israel Channel 2.

The report said that the rules have been tightened in response to the missing missing Malaysian plane MH370.

Additional unnamed measures have been taken to protect Israel from potential attacks via its airspace from hijacked/sabotaged commercial jetliners.

There is suspicion among some Israeli security experts that Iran is involved in the plane’s disappearance.

 

Suicide Bus Bombing Kills South Korean Christians on Holy Land Pilgrimage

If nobody else is going to say it, I will: Stay out of Egypt!

Untitled

A bus full of South Korean Christians who saved money for years in order to visit biblical sites in Egypt and Israel were attacked Sunday by a suicide bomber.

Four people were killed in the bombing, including the Egyptian driver, a church member, and two South Korean guides. At least 14 others were injured, the Associated Press reports.

This is not the first time South Korean Christians have been the target of violence in a foreign country. In 2007, after a 43-day hostage situation left two South Korean missionaries dead in Afghanistan, South Korea subsequently banned citizens from traveling to certain majority-Muslim countries—which proved to be a blessing in disguise for Korean Christians.

This time, the 31 churchgoers on the bus came from a Presbyterian church south of Seoul, as they were touring biblical sites in commemoration of the church’s 60th anniversary of its founding.

“No one has claimed responsibility for the blast, which bore the hallmarks of attacks blamed on al-Qaida-linked militant groups that have been battling government forces in Sinai’s restive north for years,” the AP reports.

On Sunday, the church group was about to enter Israel from the Egyptian border town of Taba after visiting an ancient monastery in Sinai. The group had left South Korea last Monday on its 12-day tour of Israel, Egypt, and Turkey.

”My mother was a devout Christian,” the dead church member’s daughter, surnamed Yoon, told South Korea’s Yonhap news agency. ”I don’t know how such a thing could happen. I don’t know how to react to this.”

South Korea has long been known for its zeal for mission work, with nearly 30 percent of the country’s population claiming Christianity. They have 20,000 missionaries in 177 countries, ranking No. 6 in the world for sending the most missionaries. Some Korean Christian leaders see the existing travel bans not as a hindrance to missions work, but an opportunity to “focus Korean missions in areas where missionaries are more accepted and more likely to be successful,” CT reported.

CT regularly reports on South Korea and South Korean missions, including a 2006 cover story on how Christians in South Korea sent more missionaries than any other country besides the United States.

CT also regularly reports on pilgrimages, including how modern pilgrimage sites and classic pilgrimage sites offer surprising rewards for the Christians who visit them.

 

Is Hezbollah About to Withdraw From Syria?

One can but hope so…(Photo: wikicommons/ yeowatzup)

Writing at the Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs, retired Israeli Brigadier General Shimon Shapira wonders if the ongoing debate inside Iran on the expenditure on behalf of Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad is a portent of an upcoming Iranian disengagement from civil war-torn Syria in the form of pulling out Iran’s client terror organization, Hezbollah:

Although Hezbollah’s leaders claim it is fighting in Syria in order to protect Lebanon, Lebanese Shiites are not convinced and Hezbollah’s supporters are dubious. Hezbollah has now lost almost 350 men in Syria, not all of whom have been brought back to Lebanon for burial, while the number of wounded has passed a thousand. This puts into question Hezbollah’s ability to keep sacrificing its fighters in Syria when its target of jihad is Israel.

 

Sole Survivor of a Harrowing Religious Cleansing Operation Has a Message For You

This Sole Survivor Of A Harrowing Religious Cleansing Operation Has A Message For You

Late in the evening of November 28 last year, Habila Adamu was at home with his wife and kids in the Yobe state of Northern Nigeria when visitors stopped by. He opened the door, shocked to find gunmen wearing robes and masks.

They demanded he step outside and they peppered him with questions. What was his name? Habila Adamu. Was he a member of the Nigerian police? No. Was he a soldier? No. Was he a member of the state security service? No. He told them he was a businessman.

“OK, are you a Christian?” they asked.

“I am a Christian,” Habila said.

Initially fearful, Habila came to terms with the realization that it was the day of his death. He began praying for strength, forgiveness and salvation…

Read on here.

 

Nigeria Bishop Tells of Church ‘Slaughter’

The BBC:

Army patrolling the town of Maiduguri in Borno state (30 April 2013)

A senior cleric has spoken of how suspected Islamist militants “slaughtered” some 30 churchgoers in north-eastern Nigeria on Sunday.

The Bishop of Yola told the BBC the insurgents had locked the church and “cut people’s throats” in Waga Chakawa village, Adamawa state.

On the same day, militants also attacked Kawuri village in neighbouring Borno state, killing 52 people.

Both assaults were blamed on the Islamist Boko Haram group.

The organisation – whose name means “Western education is forbidden” – is especially active in the north-east of the country.

Boko Haram wants to impose a severe form of Islamic law, and has been blamed for thousands of deaths…

The Bishop of Yola, Mamza Dami Stephen, said parishioners had told him about what happened on Sunday morning.

They described how the insurgents had arrived on trucks and locked the church “towards the end of the service”.

“Some people tried to escape through the windows and the [attackers] shot at them,” the bishop said.

The militants set off bombs, before burning houses and taking residents hostage during a four-hour siege.

The bishop said locals were gripped by terror.

“Everybody is living in fear,” he explained.

“There is no protection. We cannot predict where and when they are going to attack. People can’t sleep with their eyes closed.”

Horrific.

 

Israel Foils Al-Qaida Plan to Bomb US Embassy

Well done!

Israel has foiled an Al Qaeda plan to attack the U.S. Embassy in Tel Aviv, Fox News confirmed.

According to a senior U.S. official who has been briefed on the intelligence shared by Shin Bet, Israel’s internal security agency, about the plot,  “we have no reason to question the Israeli intelligence.”

“Details are still emerging,” he said.

The official described the plot as “audacious” and involving a “small cell.”

Shin Bet said Wednesday it arrested three Palestinians it accuses of plotting to carry out bombings, shootings, kidnappings and other attacks.

It said the men, two from Jerusalem and one from the West Bank, were recruited by an operative based in the Gaza Strip who worked for Al Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahiri.

Shin Bet alleges the Palestinians planned on attacking a Jerusalem conference center with firearms and then killing rescue workers with a truck bomb.

It said Al Qaeda also planned to send foreign militants to attack the U.S. Embassy in Tel Aviv on the same day using explosives supplied by the Palestinians.

 

Egypt’s Anglicans Hopeful Despite Tough Times

The small Christian community has faced harassment but priests believe interfaith dialogues are bearing fruit.

AlJazeera reports:

Last summer, as unrest raged in Cairo, Egypt’s small Anglican community started looking for a way out. One family made for Canada, another went to Australia, and several emigrated to the United States.

As exoduses go, Anglican emigration has been small compared to the torrent of fleeing Coptic Orthodox migrants, but with approximately 3000-4000 congregants, the Anglican Church’s problems over the past few years have mirrored those of the wider Christian population.

When modern Egypt’s worst bout of sectarian violence erupted in August, few Anglicans were left untouched by the fallout. Two of the Anglican community’s 15 churches were attacked, while only the timely arrival of the army spared a third, and those inside it, from an irate mob intent on setting it alight.

The Coptic Orthodox community accounts for at least 95 percent of Egyptian Christians, and “when there are difficulties, they’re usually the ones to suffer,” said the Reverend Drew Schmotzer, an Anglican chaplain in Cairo. “But we’re a minority within a minority, and we’re not strong on numbers.”

Rest here. And, from the conclusion:

… The break from Anglicanism’s English roots doesn’t end there. Egyptian Anglicans practice an unusual blend of Eastern and Western Christian traditions. They celebrate Christmas when Westerners do, but mark Easter a little later in the year with the Coptic Orthodox.

More tellingly still, for an Anglican church whose British and American branches are torn between competing conservative and moderate factions, its Egyptian wing remains united in its opposition to same-sex marriage and the ordination of gay priests. “We don’t have any liberals here,” the Reverend Bakheet said with a grin. “We refuse to ordain homosexuals because the Bible says so.”

 

Christian Persecution Expected to Rise in 2014

Vatican Radio reports:

The persecution of Christians is expected to rise in 2014, according to a nonprofit organization whose mission is to raise awareness about Christian persecution and to offer pastoral and practical support to persecuted Christians around the world.

Release International has highlighted two challenging areas for Christians this year, said spokesperson Andrew Boyd.

The first, he said, is “the continuing rise of Islamist persecution” in the form of militant groups that are seeking to change the governments within their countries and to take power, in particular, in Afghanistan and Nigeria, which are both set for elections this year.

The Taliban in Afghanistan, he said, will likely increase its attacks as NATO troops pull out by the end of 2014. In Nigeria, the Islamic militant group Boko Haram has already declared war on the Nigerian president and on Christians, said Boyd.

The second challenging area is the communist and post-communist world. Boyd identified North Korea to be the biggest concern. “North Korea has headed many organizations’ lists as the worst persecutor of Christians in the world for quite some time now,” he said.

He also identified a particular dynamic in countries of Central Asia, where majority-Muslim populations and a background culture of communism come together. Though constitutionally secular, in nations “where you have a strong Islamic culture and a strong communist culture, there you have really quite a great deal of oppression,” Boyd said.

Elaborating on the situation in Afghanistan, Boyd explained that “anyone who converted to Christianity (has) either faced persecution by the state or risked being murdered by their relatives”.

“There are Christians who are active in Afghanistan and there are Muslims who are wanting to convert. The numbers may be small but the oppression against them is absolutely severe and the authorities today are turning a blind eye to persecution in that country,” he said.

Boyd said the situation in Afghanistan is important to understand, despite the few Christians there, because it serves as “a reflection of what is happening in other countries, where there’s a hardening of religious fundamentalism against Christianity and against anyone who would like to change their faith.”

Christians, heeding the words of Jesus, know there will always be persecution, stated Boyd. “But that doesn’t mean that we stay silent about it,” he added. Scripture urges Christians to both remember those who suffer and to speak out against injustice, he continued.

“There is a need for advocacy. There is a need to say that this (persecution) is wrong,” he said. “Governments need to be taking action to do something about this. Laws are unjust. They need to be changed.”

Listen to the full interview with Andrew Boyd: RealAudioMP3

 

Christians Killed in Bomb Attack As They Leave Christmas Day Service In Iraq

A scary place to be a Christian. The Tablet:

More than thirty five people have been killed and others wounded in a series of bomb attacks on Christians in Iraq on Christmas Day.

A car bomb, detonated outside St John’s Catholic church in the Dora area of Baghdad, killed at least 26 people and wounded 38 others as they left a Christmas day service, officials said on Wednesday.

Earlier two bombs at a market in the al-Athorien district, a majority Christian area, killed at least 11 people and injured 21 more.

No one has claimed responsibility for the attacks but Christians have been victims of escalating violence in Iraq since the fall of Saddam Hussein in 2003.

 

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